Aqumarine 

Aquamarine, named for the Latin phrase “water of the sea”, is the blue to blue-green variety Beryl. Beryl also contains other gem varieties, including Emerald, and some lesser known varieties such as Morganite and Heliodor. … The green hues in most Aquamarine can also be removed through heat treatment.

Aquamarine is the  for the month of March. The seawater color of aquamarine has given this gemstone its name as the name “aquamarine” is derived from the Latin word for seawater. The specific term “aquamarine” was apparently used in an important gemological work by Anselmus de Boodt in his Gemmarum et Lapidum Historiia,” published in 1609. Aquamarine is a valued gem of ancient lineage. In the 19th century, sea green varieties of the stone were the most popular, but today, the more blue the color, the more valuable the stone. In 1910, the largest ever aquamarine was found in  weighing 243 pounds. It was then cut into smaller stones, yielding over 200,000 carats.

 There are many myths and legends about the aquamarine stone. The Romans believed that if the figure of a frog were carved on an aquamarine, it served to reconcile enemies and make them friends. Another Roman legend stated that the stone absorbs the atmosphere of young love: “When blessed and worn, it joins in love, and does great things.” Aquamarine was also considered the most appropriate morning gift to give to a bride by her groom following the consummation of their marriage. The Greeks and the Romans knew the aquamarine as the sailor’s gem, ensuring the safe and prosperous passage across stormy seas. In Medieval times, the stone was thought to reawaken the love of married couples. It was also believed to render soldiers invincible.